Krasl

An undated piece by Paul S. Bringle, entitled “We Are Very Grateful,” is a statement about the government giving veterans money. It will be part of the “Lines with Power and Purpose: Editorial Cartoons” exhibit opening at The Krasl Art Center.

ST. JOSEPH — Open a newspaper to the opinion page in 2020, and you might see an editorial cartoon of Nancy Pelosi and Donald Trump fighting about something.

But in 1940, you might have seen something about Nazis or President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Krasl

“Well! What are you going to do about it?” by an artist known as “Army” depicts organized crime in Oklahoma City in 1940. The editorial cartoon is part of the “Lines with Power and Purpose: Editorial Cartoons” exhibit opening at The Krasl Art Center this weekend. Of note on this piece are the comments made in the top right hand corner of the drawing from the artist’s mentor.

Krasl

This piece from 1939, is by an artist known as X. Ding. The cartoon is entitled “Every Day is Ground Hog’s Day in Europe,” and will be part of the “Lines with Power and Purpose: Editorial Cartoons” exhibit at The Krasl Art Center.

Krasl

This piece by Anne H. Berry is part of “Ongoing Matter,” a collection of poster designs developed by nine designers across the U.S. intended to increase access to, and facilitate engagement with, the Report On the Investigation Into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election – more colloquially known as The Mueller Report.

Krasl

This piece by Marie Bourgeois is part of “Ongoing Matter,” a new exhibit opening at the Krasl Art Center this weekend.

Contact: anewman@TheHP.com, 932-0357, Twitter: @HPANewman