Recipes to help you celebrate Rosh Hashanah

“Usually challah is a braided oval, but we make a round one on Rosh Hashanah to symbolize the never-ending cycle of years and seasons,” says Emily Paster, author of “The Joys of Jewish Preserving.”

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, differs from what many of us consider a typical New Year’s Eve celebration – with its focus on carousing and having a great time, at least until the following morning.

Rosh Hashanah, which starts tonight at sundown and ends Friday evening, is steeped in millennia of historic tradition. It celebrates heritage and rejuvenation.

Recipes to help you celebrate Rosh Hashanah

"The Joys of Jewish Preserving: Modern Recipes with Traditional Roots, for Jams, Pickles, Fruit Batters and More – For Holidays and Every Day" by Emily Paster

Recipes to help you celebrate Rosh Hashanah

Keftes de prasa, or leek fritters, are a perfect appetizer for a Rosh Hashanah meal, author Emily Paster says. "And, naturally, leeks are also a symbolic food for the start of the new year," she says. "The word for leek in Hebrew is related to the word kareyt, which means ‘to cut.’ Prior to eating leeks on Rosh Hashanah, Sephardic Jews recite a special prayer that those who wish to hurt them will instead be cut down.”

Recipes to help you celebrate Rosh Hashanah

One of the most common Rosh Hashanah traditions is to eat sweet foods – like this Apple Honey and Rose Water Jam – to symbolize the hope for a sweet new year.