‘Witch hunt’ against Clintons was worse

Editor,

I’m so sick of the double standard we have in this country. All the screams about Robert Mueller’s “witch hunt.” Anyone remember the Republicans’ efforts to indict Bill and Hillary Clinton on the White Water deal? That started in 1992 and ended in the year 2000, after eight years – four times longer than Robert Mueller’s investigation.

Neither Bill Clinton nor Hillary Clinton were ever prosecuted after three separate inquiries found insufficient evidence linking them with the criminal conduct of others related to the land deal. Kenneth Starr’s successor as independent counsel, Robert Ray, released a report in September 2000 that stated, “This office determined that the evidence was insufficient to prove to a jury beyond a reasonable doubt that either President or Mrs. Clinton knowingly participated in any criminal conduct.” Sound familiar? The General Accounting Office announced that Starr had spent nearly $30 million on his investigation as of September 1997.

In the Sunday Herald-Palladium, letter writer Dennis Barnes mentions the Mueller investigation lasted two years and two months (well short of the eight years of the Whitewater investigation) and claims the estimated costs at $31-35 million. Over 20 years ago the cost of the Whitewater investigation was nearly $30 million. Adjust for inflation and it totals over $48 million dollars in 2019. And by the way, Mr. Barnes, after 20 years we are still waiting for the Republicans to apologize to the Clintons and the American taxpayers.

No obstruction of justice for Donald Trump? But for the wise Republicans who refused to carry out Donald Trump’s attempts to get rid of Robert Mueller and end his investigations, there would be no doubt at all of any obstruction of justice charges. As it is, there is enough in the Mueller report to indicate obstruction.

By the way, when POTUS talks about “witch hunts,” how many years did he spend trying to prove Barak Obama was not a U.S. citizen? Double standards!

Alan Phillips

St. Joseph

Trump’s tariff wars endanger our economy

Editor,

Donald Trump repeatedly claims that the escalating tariffs he is imposing on China will be “mostly” paid for by China. As is so often the case, Trump’s claim is a lie.

Tariffs are taxes that businesses and individuals pay on goods imported from another country. The country that is exporting the goods, like China, does not pay the tariff.

Many studies have documented the fact that Trump’s tariffs are being paid for by U.S. businesses and consumers. A recent study by the New York Federal Reserve Bank found that in 2018 “U.S. tariffs were almost completely passed through into U.S. domestic prices... .” The study also found that “U.S. producers responded to reduced import competition by raising their prices.” During 2018, Trump’s tariffs cost U.S. consumers “at least $6.9 billion.”

Farmers have been particularly hard hit by Trump’s trade war. In Illinois, Indiana and Wisconsin, bankruptcies have risen to the highest level in a decade.

Trump has not only imposed new tariffs on China, he has also imposed them on Canada and the European Union. These tariffs have strained our relationships with our closest allies. Many of those countries are now moving away from the U.S. and forming trade deals with other nations.

Historically, trade wars have done great harm. They depress economic growth, increase inflation and cost jobs. In 1930, the trade war triggered by the Smoot-Hawley act turned a recession into a depression.

The U.S. Constitution says that Congress has complete authority to set tariffs and regulate commerce with foreign nations. Unfortunately, over the years Congress has relinquished more and more of this authority to the executive branch. As the current trade crisis makes clear, when an impulsive, self-centered demagogue becomes president, trade authority can do great damage.

Trump is a dangerous charlatan. Congress and the American people need to rein him in and then show him the door.

Tim Walls

Saint Joseph

First responders showed professionalism

Editor,

I would like to share my appreciation for our local emergency, medical and road commission professionals who responded to an emergency that occurred at my residence on Red Arrow Highway in Coloma on May 20.

It was by divine intervention that no one was injured or killed when a driver became incoherent while fully engaging her gas pedal, plowing through 100 yards of my property, finally hitting my parked Ford F150 broadside, flipping the vehicle. While the gas pedal was fully engaged, the road commission employees quickly assisted by forcing the vehicle into park and pulling the keys from the ignition to stop the wheels from turning.

I was so impressed with the professional manner in which the road commission employee contacted 911 while I comforted the child that was in the vehicle during the ordeal. The police officers from Coloma and Watervliet were there within three to five minutes and took control of the scene. Also dispatched was the fire department, as the flipped vehicle could have been leaking gas. Finally, the Coloma ambulance arrived and the medics took immediate care of the driver and her son.

So many things could have gone wrong; however, I remain thankful the driver and her son are OK and there were no injuries to the road commission employees or any other drivers during the busy morning traffic. We have a total loss with our parked vehicle, as it absorbed the brunt force of the collision, but everyone was safe in the end.

The dedication of our emergency responders is so important for our community and worth every penny of taxes paid. Thank you.

Laurie Walter

Coloma

BH students’ music video is inspiring

Editor,

Wooooohoooo!!!

I just watched the video “Get Up” on the RTG Media YouTube channel.

Congratulations to those four Benton Harbor Area Schools students, and all who helped create the video, for reminding us all about the abilities of the human spirit in overcoming challenges.

Let’s “put your hands in the air” and applaud that these young people refuse to be defined by negativity. There is hope for the future.

Raelene Stickney

St. Joseph